Tag Archives: logic

I Really Like Logic, But …

Response to 9to5 Review of Logic 10.4.x

First of all, thanks to 9to5 for this in-depth review of Logic, not just 3rd party plug-ins – yes, you’re making me eat my words, and in this case I’m happy to. Second, I really like Logic a lot. Third, [and this is very difficult and troubling for me, because I really like Logic], I used to use Logic as an on-set audio tracker and was beginning to use it as a ProTools Replacement for audio post, BUT: There are a couple of issues that Apple has refused to address, even in this latest release, (I’ve tried many times and currently have 3 open support tickets going back to the summer of 2017), and they are both related to Logic’s ability to manage linear time. Here they are:

1) The out point of a project cannot be stretched, after-the-fact if the incoming audio TC transits 21:00:00;00. So, I open a new project, import tracks with the project conforming to the TC of the income audio – here’s the kicker, if the project goes past 21:00:00;00, the outpoint of the project timeline cannot be stretched to include the audio that transits that bearer – even though you can see the grayed-out audio tracks on the timeline. 2) Locking Logic to incoming TC [which is crucial to audio tracking that is slated for audio post with lock-to-picture] mysteriously stops at about 13:00:00;00. I use a Steinberg Nuendo Syncstation to grab House TC and make it available to my audio NLE via the USB port. With Logic all of the setup is obvious [if you do this for a living] and FAST, and, it just works … right up until, 13:00:00;00. What happens next is, Logic stops the recording and will not Play or Record or Freewheel until I disengage the external TC source, in Logic settings.

Much like FCPX is for professions that want to get a lot of work done faster and more efficiently, so too is Logic to the professional in real-world workflows. ProTools is fine, but Logic kills it, and after decades of using ProTools and Avid workflows in general, I’m beyond tired of Avid’s licensing BS. FCPX and Logic, done. But, Apple has got to fix these core TC issues in Logic, and, Apple has got to make a true, out-of-box round-tripping workflow between FCPX and Logic. I really like Apple’s media production tools and they come so dang close to killing everything else out there. Original 9to5 article.

Apple Matters Audio FCPX Logic X Tech Blog Work

A “Pro” Post to My “Pro” Blog for Professionals

It’s kind of interesting to analyze the effect of the label, “Pro”, when I’m on the consumer side versus the professional side. As a consumer the term, “Pro”, makes me feel a bit more comfortable with how much I’m about to spend, and as a professional user, it makes me raise my eyebrows in unapologetic suspicion. (If it’s really a professional product, aimed at professionals, why does it need to be said with an obviously manipulating title like “Pro”?)

I’m going to try the car analogy, again: In terms of basic performance, I can turn a VW bug into a Porsche 911, (that used to be possible), but if I do that, in the end, I still have a VW Bug, but a lot faster one. And, up to a point, being faster counts, but it’s still a Bug. If I really want the complete, carefully balanced, actual Porsche experience, I must buy a Porsche 911.

And this my friends is yet another attempt to explain my near contempt for the the whole of the iMac product line. Apple takes their iVW, a very cool machine in its own right, puts a screaming fast engine in it, slaps the “Pro” moniker on it and once again evades having to actually make another, real, professional desktop computer. To a consumer the speed of this thing, alone, makes the initial experience surreal – in a good way, to a professional, the speed is thrilling for somewhere between one hour and a week, or so. After that, I start asking real-world questions like: how come I have to tear the screen off of the front in order to do a basic thing like upgrade or change RAM? Or, swap CPUs to upgrade or downgrade the number of cores I’m using? [Yes, I might want to do that because the fewer the cores, the faster each core goes – see?) Or, why can’t I add high-end video cards to the existing system – Oh wait, I can! But, oh wait, I want to add six video cards to my system so that I can scale how my professional software applications use them – like Windows users can – And, yay! Look mom, six video cards, but, what a freaking mess on my physical desktop. Sure wish I could just put those things inside of my computer. And, my OS is still optimized for only one kind of video card language? (I’m speaking here of CL vs. GL.) Yes I can use both, but only one is actually native to the OS. WTF! I really do not want to get stuck with Windows, again, but, I will. Well, I think you get the point.

And, where is Linux in all of this marketing obfuscation [BS]? Linux foundations have the potential to build highly customized machines on a wonderful plethora of UIs on very powerful hardware architectures … Why is it that all I can hear from the Linux side is crickets chirping? (There actually are a few open source products, but a very few, and to-date, nothing that can well replace software products from Avid, Apple and Adobe, maybe with the exception of Black Magic and their Linux-ready Fusion product.) Please get on the ball and save those of us who: 1) Actually do care about what we use, but; 2) Are beyond weary of having to argue for anything and everything that isn’t 1000% Microsoft; 3) Are sick and tired of having to slog through the cesspool of hardware and software that recklessly slaps the, “Pro” label on everything – to the point that even consumers, by now, are completely desensitized to it. If any Linux developers want to take a serious stab at creating a truly professional environment for high-end media production workflows, please feel free to give me a call, because I guarantee you, there is a huge market place of deluded, tired and disenfranchised media producers who, still have a passion for the work, want to know and trust that the hardware and software they’re using IS professional, and, who are beyond weary of the two-choice reality they [we, I] work in. I’m serious.

One last stab at the genericized “Pro” moniker: If all software and hardware developers provided a class of products that had the fully spelled out word, “Professional” on it, would that somehow produce a greater sense of responsibility to think beyond basic marketing strategy. Hmmm …

In the meantime, I’m getting ready to install new Windows machines for our Adobe Premiere”Pro”/After Effects post production peeps [formally Mac-based], and iMac”Pro”s for our Final Cut “Pro” X/Motion users. And the jury is still out for our “Pro” Tools and Logic “Pro” X camps. They’re all unified in not wanting to go back to Windows, but they’re not convinced they want to get stuck with the iVW either, because, by now, they’re all fully aware of the BS factor in the “Pro” moniker and how difficult it has become escaping from it. I’ll let you know how it goes. (Nix folks, call me, really.)

Will The Real Logic Pro X Please Stand Up

Is there somewhere “real” Logic users can discuss all aspects of this fantastic ProTools Replacement … (With one exception.) All of the latest plug-ins, instruments and etc. are completely cool, but Logic is a full featured audio post production tool that needs to be talked about in that context. I seriously wonder how many audio-house post pros are actually aware of that. I cannot remember 9to5 once reviewing Logic, only 3rd party stuff, and rarely anything except instruments. Logic is a serious and complete audio production tool and once that’s realized, maybe Apple will be inspired to do more than just “fix” things, but to also continue to develop it as a truely audio postproduction/production tool set.

Final thought: I so want to get excited about FCPX 10.4’s new Logic plug-ins updates, I really do. And of course this isn’t the first update to FCPX’s audio tool kit – a very good one I might add. But, I can only get to, meh … Why? Because, by now we should’ve been well on our way to a full blown round-trip workflow between FCPX and Logic Pro X.

Audio FCPX Logic X Tech Blog

Logic X and macOS 10.13 – A Winning Weekend of Production

Logic X/APFS/macOS High Sierra

It was a winning weekend of tracking audio for approximately fifteen hours of live television broadcasting and internet streaming. A few of the programs were only half a dozen tracks, but most of the programs were talking-head panels or full blown music programs requiring 15-20 audio tracks. Beginning this week all of the audio, including dialogue, will be sweetened, fixed and where necessary, re-recorded, with the final output laid back to fully post-produced video. I have done this sort of thing for years, but what made it a bit of a nail-biter this year was that I decided to upgrade to macOS 10.13, alias, High Sierra. Hopefully it does not need to be said, but in case it does – yes – I was runnning a fully redundant tracking system on a completely different workstation. In the end, Logic X and High Sierra came through with flying colors.

I have always preferred to use Apple’s Logic X for this sort of thing, in fact, for audio tracking and post production, Logic X has pretty much negated the need for ProTools. Make no mistake, ProTools is a fine product and unarguably an industry standard, but it turns out that Logic X does just about everything ProTools can do and does it less expensively and is much more elegant to maintain and keep upgraded. All of the plug-ins I need are available in both ProTools and Logic X and in environments where audio and video are going to remain locked from recording through post, Logic really is a much more elegant tool. It’s a bit odd how Apple has clearly marketed their professional audio product to home musicians and electronic music composers, but the truth is, it makes the cost and, honestly, hassle of installing and maintaining ProTools pretty much unecessary.

As for the the OS update: Personally I look more for what’s going on under the hood of Apple’s upgrades and updates, for both hardware and software, and this year Apple’s new file system, APFS, represents what I think is going to be one of the most important core upgrades in quite some time. (And in case this needs to be said, I would not leap to upgade workstation to OS 10.13 in mission-critical scenarios. Give it time and for sure, wait until the ProApps system libraries are updated, which some think will be sooner than later.)

As for Logic X, I do continue to have some oddities with getting logic to function properly with incoming timecode from an external source, or the timecode stamps on incoming Video with audio. What’s weird is that these issues seem to be related to the relative time of day, so Logic will lock to TC just fine up to a certain time of day and after that I have problems getting it to lock properly, and these issues are 100% repeatable. I’ve already done some tech calls to Apple and they are assuring me that they can get the issue resolved – let’s see what happens. I’m thinking one reason issues like this slip through the cracks is that there’s not enough industrial/pro use going on at the level ProTools has, so little but important things get by.

That’s all for now, just wanted to give a report on taking the plunge in a critical production scenario with macOS 10.13 and Logic X. Please leave comments in any form – praise, reprisals, objections, rebuttal and funny faces – below.