Tag Archives: ios

Proper Handling of Trial App Versions In The App Store Is A Mutual Responsibility, Shared By The Store and The Developer

9to5Mac MarsEdit developer lists 8 problems with Apple’s approach to free trials of iOS apps

I certainly see some of the these points as valid – and apparantly licensing is always difficult – and I see this because I get to deal with really ridiculous licensing architectures like, iLOK. O M G! I’m compelled to use AVID’s ProTools, (as opposed to Apple’s Logic X), because Apple refuses to fix a fatal timecode flaw in that product, which would otherwise be a ProTools killer. But, I digress.

Digidesigns’ ProTools, even before they were scooped up by AVID, has always chosen the absolutely, most complicated licensing schemes they can get their hands on, and that alone kills what would otherwise be a perfectly adequate tool for audio professionals. (It’s like being kidnapped by outlaw bad guys and then being forced to dance around the campfire while they shoot at my feet.) I respect the right of all authors, whatever it is that’s being authored, to protect their work and to make sure there is proper compensation for all instances of it’s existence in the wild, but, what it all comes down to is, we, the end-users that actually shell out the $, are the ones that suffer. I think this article kind of gets to that point.

The word confusing pops up several times and that’s something that can turn users away. In the context of where the App Store is now, I see an interesting system where a developer will release a “lite” version and a “full”, or, “Pro” version. Sometimes the move from lite to Pro or Full can be made by an “In-App” purchase, or, the two installs are completely separate. For me this has generally worked very well, to the point that I really miss it when there’s a $10-$50 app that I think will be a useful tool, but, there’s no way to try it before I commit to it. Something else I miss on the App Store is the simple ability to download a trial version of an application that has a built-in time out feature. This allows me, the all important end-user, to try the app before I commit to it, and, gets me off of my butt to make a committment by the end of the trial period. All that being said, I’m glad there’s an attempt being made to provide trial versions.

To both the App Store and the Developers: Don’t make it confusing; don’t make it frustrating; don’t make it complicated; and, remember where the actual money comes from. We the end-users are watching. (This could be a good thing – make it so.)

ApplePay Progress In My Area – Updated

In Southern IL not so much. One of the first places in my area was Panera, but the system at that particular store works sometimes and not at other times. Interestingly, I spent a month working in London last year and was able to use Apple Pay almost everywhere, even in the outlying areas of the city. And, in that city, the best exchange rate I could get was to use my Simple Bank card, with or without my iPhone, at most any ATM – even when including the service fee it beat anything I could get walking into a bank or exchange shop. Where I live won’t be much empowered with AP until/unless Sams, Walmart and Target get on the ball, which I’m guessing won’t be anytime soon.

Update

All three Aldis that are within driving distance now take Apple Pay, sort of. Before I get into what that looks like – Target and Sam’s Club also allow you to check out using your iOS device, but, not Apple Pay specifically. Target really doesn’t work out well since all you get to do is scan your discount barcode from your phone, but you still are compelled to use cash or plastic to complete your transaction. Sam’s Club takes this one step farther and actually does allow you to checkout using your phone, but they’ve circumvented Apple Pay by having customers scan their own shopping cart items so that when you get to the register you, again, scan a barcode, but, this time the app is directly connected to a qualified card so you can, in fact, complete your check out with nothing but your phone, assuming you’ve got the app set up correctly BEFORE going into the store. It takes a little practice, but it really speeds up getting through checkout.

Now back to Aldis. I live in southern IL, so if you’re familiar with the area you’ll know the cities I’m going to refer to. Harrisburg: This is my least favorite Aldis because they just don’t have the selection that the other two stores in my area have, and significantly fewer organic choices across the board, but, Apply Pay in that store is the most reliable of the three. Marion: The hands-down best of the three stores for overall selection and certified organic meats and fresh produce, (still needs more improvement along these lines, but the best of the three to date). Apple Pay is spotty and the cashiers are not very friendly to helping the process along if Apple doesn’t connect properly the first time. Carbondale: Has an overall decent selection of food products, but has some catching up to do to match what the Marion store offers in the way of organics. Apple Pay is very spotty and the cashiers very unfriendly to assisting customers if the Apple Pay connection doesn’t succeed the first time. Unfriendly to the point where, if they see me whip out my phone to pay they will literally star off into the distance behind me, and if I ask for assistance they will not move a muscle to tear their eyes away from the distant object while mumbling that they don’t know anything about that. I’ve had that experience just about every time I’ve walked into that store – the Apple Pay fail followed by the attitude.

An additional store that now takes Apple Pay without prejudice is, Staples, where about 80% of my Apple Pay transactions succeed and if they don’t the cashier are generally about as attentive to the customer’s situation as if you are using plastic. There may be other stores in my area that are now taking Apple Pay, but I’m unaware of them if they are. Whenever I go to a store for the first time, or that I have not visited in awhile, I will almost always ask they take Apple Pay and I do it as an awareness campaign for those that don’t. Oh yeah, and all of the Subways in the region are also taking Apple Pay and it seems pretty reliable at the two stores I frequent.

I really appreciate not having to shell out cash, which tends to get onlookers more interested in my wallet than I’m comfortable with, and I really don’t miss having to use plastic where I put myself at risk twice with every transaction in a checkout line – Once when I pull the card out and expose the card number and the second time is when I often have to enter a four-digit security code. (I’ve actually been scammed this way before and was aware that the person behind was paying too close attention to the card I was holding in my hand even as I was doing my level best to keep it tucked in my palm and held up agains my stomach while I waited for the cashier to complete the scanning process of my purchase. I almost have instant recall for long strings of numbers so I know this is easily possible. If it doesn’t come naturally a person can train themselves to remember long strings of numbers almost instantly.)

For me, Apple Pay is not only cool, but mostly, it’s just more secure for paying when shopping in the corporeal world.

Where’s the iPad MINI PRO? Tsuro by @Thunderbox_ent has just released a major update to one of its games and an all-time favorite of mine, Tsuro. It is a rare game, and in this case a board game, that is the perfect zen between intellectual engagement and zoning-out.

Where’s the iPad MINI PRO?

Tsuro by @Thunderbox_ent has just released a major update to one of its games and it’s an all-time favorite of mine, Tsuro. It is a rare game, and in this case a board game, that is the perfect zen between intellectual engagement and zoning-out. When I come home and play a computer game – which is not often – I don’t like to be left staring at the wall with no registrable EEG when I’m finished playing it, I like to have some brain function left. Tsuro fllls that occasional and important niche for me.

Thunderbox’s significant upgrade to the game, in its basic format, plays just fine on both of my iOS devices. In this update Thunderbox has included access to @Apple AR technology, but alas, while the new features work just fine on my iPhone 8, the AR on my expensive 256GB, iPad Mini 4 is a no-go. Sans AR, the basic, non-AR game-play on my iPad Mini is just fine, but I want the same AR experience on my Mini without having to buy the smaller of the two current versions of the iPad Pro.

I’m very disappointed, as is more and more often the case with my Apple experiences. The fact that Apple continues to try and force my hand into buying exactly what they want me to buy rather than meeting my needs as they exist in the real world, is a growing frustration. I’m fairly certain that “my needs” are not so unique that they are completely isolated from the needs of a significant number of on-going Apple users. I have strong evidence of this because just about the time I think I’ve thought of a unique product recommendation or feature request, almost always I find that many others have beat me to the proverbial punch. This is even more poignant with regard to their professional products, hardware and software, but that’s for another post.

Suffice it to say that, if/when/ever, Apple decides to cough up an iPad Mini Pro, I will mortgage the farm to get it, but I will not be forced/coerced into buying a full-size iPad Pro under any circumstances. It’s almost like Apple realizes they’ve got us, and not unlike the phone company and cellular service providers in general, they believe they can get away with anything. Maybe they can, time will certainly tell, but there is a breaking point with me and those with similar experiences and expectations. I have invested a lot in Apple tech, up to and including, staking my professional reputation on its hardware and software technologies, over and over again, over the years. After the badly down-played XSAN fiasco I have backed way down from insisting on Apple products for professional application. On the consumer side of things I have also become much less vocal for pro-Apple evangelism. And for the record, I do not believe it has anything much to do with who’s at the helm. Even with Steve driving the company, it was headed in the same directions. But again, this is for another post.

Lack of AR on my recently purchased iPad Mini 4, and lack of talk of a Mini Pro, (which is why I bought the iPad Mini 4), leaves me wondering how much longer I can continue to invest in Apple, as a consumer and as a market investor. I guess one voice is, one voice – but, there is that voice, for whatever it’s worth.

Thanks For The Reviews iMore!

http://www.imore.com/iphone-6s-review

Got my 6S last week [upgrading from 5S] after doing a lot of reading, mostly from iMore. For me performance is everything with all computing devices, big or small, desktop or hand-held, and it became clear to me that the 6S(+) hardware was going to offer everything that is possible with the technology this year – and I am not dissapointed. This thing is fast and the 3D touch is absolutely a game changer for human interface with machines, and, almost all of the developers of the utility apps that I use and need are moving quickly to take advantage of the power and interface upgrades of the new hardware and iOS. This time I decided to get my phone from the Apple Store and I’m trying the new-every-two method. I’m a Verizon customer, (out of contract – yay!), and at the Apple sales person’s recommendation I called Verizon, and, long story short, they knocked $20/month off of my phone bill, per month – which offsets the $40/month iPhone payment by 50%. Wow! Who woulda thunk. Okay, enough fun, gotta get back to work. Thanks, iMore, for the 6S reviews!

5S to 6S – To Be Or Not To Be … To Be!

Just want to share a little anecdote for those considering an upgrade to one of the current iPhones. I was in St. Louis this last Sunday on some other business and decided to stop by the Apple store and look at a new phone – long story short, I upgraded from 5S to 6S last, and after some wrangling, finally got everything up and going – and, it turns out to be a very important upgrade for me, especially from a performance standpoint

I do want to elaborate on the, “wrangling”, a bit: I was using Beta 9.1/2 on my 5S and the new 6S I brought home was running 9.0. So, I was, initially, not able to restore my 5S backup to the 6S because iTunes would not allow me to restore an image from a later iOS – it took me a little while to figure out what to do, (I admit I can be a bit slow sometimes), but, I finally decided I was okay with installing Beta 9.1 on the new phone, went back to my Apple beta program email and followed the instructions to get the new 6S upgraded to iOS 9.1 beta. Now I’m able to smoothly restore my 5S backup to my 6S. In the meantime there have been a few apps that don’t want to run at all or have acted irraticaly – simply deleting and reinstalling them has fixed these problems.

My wish is that Apple would take us beta testers into account when we want to upgrade our hardware. In retrospect it makes sense that Apple would provide safeguards for its users, but, I wish they would spell it out, up front, don’t just hit me with a screen that says I can’t restore because the new device has an older iOS version – be aware that I’m using a beta of the iOS that is beyond the current stable release and spell out this fact for me, then give me on-screen instructions on what to do. Would’ve saved me a couple of hours of frustration. Even so, the final outcome is, in a word – AWESOME!

If you’re a performance oriented user and you’re upgrading from 5S or a previous version of the hardware, I would suggest that, looking over the latest iPhone iterations is definitely worth your time.

How Deep Does Your Browser Go?

 
I have long been suspicious that web browsers go deep when installed on any OS, and I beleive that the article at the head of this post is only the tip of the iceberg. It makes me wonder how we can be so cavalier about installing web browsers. Many users have multiple installations of various web browsers installed and it’s not unusual for a single user to use different web browsers to get things done. I draw the analogy that, using web browsers to get everything done is a lot like using a public restroom, where, we also eat, wash our clothes, have afternoon tea with friends, scrawl bank account passwords on the walls and stalls, and etc. I know that web browsers are not the only illegitimate way into a pc, but I have to wonder, of all of the break-ins that happen, how many are accomplished and/or initiated through launching of a web browser. Hardly a week goes by that I don’t get a pop-up of somekind that is just downright creepy – and that’s with all blocking and saftey switches fully engaged.
 
My suspicion is also why I am absolutlely not on-board with the notion of web apps. I know for a fact that web apps can save a company money, and can provide freedom from an OS App store distribution system, but I don’t think it’s worh it. I’ve been burned a few times on the web, most notably when I was more heavily into being an eBay reseller, and, before there weren’t many/any non-webb apps dedicated to buying and selling with a more closed front end. In the name of more discloser, let me say that, in retrospect, the hack [theft of login info] could have easily been avoided if had just kept mental track of how many times the convincing-looking eBay login page kept poping up. I was very busy preparing purchases and just figured that I had been logged off because of a prolonged period of inactivity, and was therefore being prompted to re-login. Thankfully the outcome of that, while bad enough, was not the end of my financial world, but it could’ve been. As it was, the hacker(s) got enough info from me that they used my account to spam thousands of other eBay users and for a few days I got many angry emails from fellow eBayers. EBay doesn’t get high marks from me for the help that they proferd after the fact, but they did help enough that I was able to make ammends to my brothers and sisters in eBay land in a fairly short time. All of that from having to use a web interface to get the job done. Yes, it could’ve happened using a non-web app, but it would have been much less likely.
 
My two personal favorite browsers are Firefox and Safar – in that order; but in the real world I will have nothing to do with Firefox, because, of all the browsers I’m convinced that it goes the very deepest into the OS. In years past, and in more recent years, major performance improvements have been yielded by completely removing Firefox from an OS – I have even won a couple of low yield bets, that, removing Firefox from a given desktop system would immedately improve performance to a greater or lesser degree, but to a measurable degree in any case – and I won both times.
 
I have finally come to the point where I only use a browser when there’s no other way, and furthermore, when a company or individual provides a product or service that forces me to use a web browser or a web app, I move on to other vendors and service providers. And, that includes the likes of mint.com and intuit.com, based on the way they used to provide their various online services only a few years ago. I think that they now provide mobile and/or dedicated desktop apps for their products and services, ultimately furthering my point. Comeing back to the realm of media production, there are a couple of companies offering some very promising video sharing and production collaboration services – guess what their interfaces are? But, if they do well, I beleive that, in the long run, they will end up developing dedicated, non-web, apps.

Ad Security In iOS9 – No Thanks To Google

 

I will always endeavor to refrain from foul language here, but I almost didn’t make it this time. Yeah, sure, it makes sense that Google recklessly advises app developers on how to disable ad security, and then, after a backlash that they labeled, “… important feedback …”, they proceed to backpedal and minimize their “advise”. What does Google care, as long as their apps are on everything so they can sell page/time/clicks, it’s no real concern of theirs. The far more appropriate thing to do was refer developers to Apple’s Ad Security documentation, where, they will/would’ve learned the same thing, but in a way that let’s the developer know that this should really not be worked around, and if worked around, it should only be done so as an absolute last resort.

Dumped Google, everything, two years ago and have not missed a thing, except the very freaky experience of having general web page browsing load up a page full of ads pointing me to web sites that sell the same product or service I just bought somewhere else. (By the way, what’s that good for again?) Sheeesh! (Sheeesh isn’t a bad word is it? Foul lingo comes as naturally to me as breathing.)

iPad Pro – Just Put A Keyboard On It …

 

I’m sorry but seriously – Just put a detachable keyboard on it and face the fact that you’ve got a laptop there – not an iOS device. I’ll even overlook the fact that Microsoft’s already done it – the detachable keyboard – and trust that Apple will get it right. What’s the point? With the work that’s undoubtely going to get done on such a device, a keyboard is only inevitable. Make a MBP and add touch screen, and you’ve got a complete – um, portable computer. The iPad Pro is going to be a laptop with touch screen + keyboard – simple as that.

@JCalMN New Apple Music Commercials, and no … No more subscriptions for me.

No subscriptions for me. Looks good though, and I think Apple’s approach, implied in the new commercials, will go a long way to getting new artists discovered. … I’m simply not going to do yet another $10/month subscription … to anything, and I’m beginning to clean out the few that I have. The day I completely lose access to Apple media content because I’m forced to have a subscription … well, it’s going to be a sad day indeed.

@iMore – Faster, Harder and Stronger!

 

To quote one of my favorite Naturopaths – “Faster, Harder and Stronger!”

Plus, very water resistant, and, wireless charging – and not wireless dock charging – I mean wireless charging. (I don’t have to drop it on a proprietary, uh, dock, it just has to be x-number of inches/feet from the charger thingy.)

Oh! And, small please.