Monthly Archives: September 2015

5S to 6S – To Be Or Not To Be … To Be!

Just want to share a little anecdote for those considering an upgrade to one of the current iPhones. I was in St. Louis this last Sunday on some other business and decided to stop by the Apple store and look at a new phone – long story short, I upgraded from 5S to 6S last, and after some wrangling, finally got everything up and going – and, it turns out to be a very important upgrade for me, especially from a performance standpoint

I do want to elaborate on the, “wrangling”, a bit: I was using Beta 9.1/2 on my 5S and the new 6S I brought home was running 9.0. So, I was, initially, not able to restore my 5S backup to the 6S because iTunes would not allow me to restore an image from a later iOS – it took me a little while to figure out what to do, (I admit I can be a bit slow sometimes), but, I finally decided I was okay with installing Beta 9.1 on the new phone, went back to my Apple beta program email and followed the instructions to get the new 6S upgraded to iOS 9.1 beta. Now I’m able to smoothly restore my 5S backup to my 6S. In the meantime there have been a few apps that don’t want to run at all or have acted irraticaly – simply deleting and reinstalling them has fixed these problems.

My wish is that Apple would take us beta testers into account when we want to upgrade our hardware. In retrospect it makes sense that Apple would provide safeguards for its users, but, I wish they would spell it out, up front, don’t just hit me with a screen that says I can’t restore because the new device has an older iOS version – be aware that I’m using a beta of the iOS that is beyond the current stable release and spell out this fact for me, then give me on-screen instructions on what to do. Would’ve saved me a couple of hours of frustration. Even so, the final outcome is, in a word – AWESOME!

If you’re a performance oriented user and you’re upgrading from 5S or a previous version of the hardware, I would suggest that, looking over the latest iPhone iterations is definitely worth your time.

Apple Ancient Gold

 This tweet reminds me that, about eight years ago I finally decided to sell several old Macs I had been hanging on to just because I couldn’t bring myself to let them go. I sold a MacPlus, an SE30 with an upgraded video board and a Color Classic. Remember that one? The sales went through eBay and I figured if I cleared $10 or $15 after expenses I’d be able to live with that. Long story short I reaped the following returns per machine, (headsup, nowhere near as dramatic as the Apple I).

Macplus: $1900.00

SE30: $1500.00

ColorClassic: $2000.00

Just FYI, each machine was fully functional and sold with its original boxes.

Well, that went so well that ten months later I decided to gather up all of my softeware and see if I could make a couple of bucks on that. It’s software right, old software, albeit with original manuals, floppy discs, etc. Still, it was software and I figured I’d be lucky if I broke even. I ended up with a couple of 40lb. boxes worth of software and related material and prepared my eBay add. It was a seven day run and for the first three days nada, zippo, notta thing – which is what I figured was going to happen, but again, I just couldn’t bring myself to simply throw it in the trash. Day four – a bite … Day five – another bite. As often happens with eBay bidding processes nothing else happened until the wee hours of the morning of Day seven and then all hell – uh – heaven, broke lose. During the last three hours bidding often would go $20 and $30 dollars at a single jump right up until the closing bell went off. The winning bid went to a lady from Martha’s Vineyard who apparently ran a vintage computer museum with lots of Macintosh memorabilia. My net profit on those two boxes of ancient software was $500.00!

So, between the hardware and software sales I easily made more than I origianlly paid for any single item. No, it wasn’t 1/2 a million or a million, but it still made my year, and reminded me that I have rarely been sorry that I’ve purchased any Apple product, even to this day. Apple is a good long-term investment whether you do it through direct purchases, or Wall Street investing.

How Deep Does Your Browser Go?

 
I have long been suspicious that web browsers go deep when installed on any OS, and I beleive that the article at the head of this post is only the tip of the iceberg. It makes me wonder how we can be so cavalier about installing web browsers. Many users have multiple installations of various web browsers installed and it’s not unusual for a single user to use different web browsers to get things done. I draw the analogy that, using web browsers to get everything done is a lot like using a public restroom, where, we also eat, wash our clothes, have afternoon tea with friends, scrawl bank account passwords on the walls and stalls, and etc. I know that web browsers are not the only illegitimate way into a pc, but I have to wonder, of all of the break-ins that happen, how many are accomplished and/or initiated through launching of a web browser. Hardly a week goes by that I don’t get a pop-up of somekind that is just downright creepy – and that’s with all blocking and saftey switches fully engaged.
 
My suspicion is also why I am absolutlely not on-board with the notion of web apps. I know for a fact that web apps can save a company money, and can provide freedom from an OS App store distribution system, but I don’t think it’s worh it. I’ve been burned a few times on the web, most notably when I was more heavily into being an eBay reseller, and, before there weren’t many/any non-webb apps dedicated to buying and selling with a more closed front end. In the name of more discloser, let me say that, in retrospect, the hack [theft of login info] could have easily been avoided if had just kept mental track of how many times the convincing-looking eBay login page kept poping up. I was very busy preparing purchases and just figured that I had been logged off because of a prolonged period of inactivity, and was therefore being prompted to re-login. Thankfully the outcome of that, while bad enough, was not the end of my financial world, but it could’ve been. As it was, the hacker(s) got enough info from me that they used my account to spam thousands of other eBay users and for a few days I got many angry emails from fellow eBayers. EBay doesn’t get high marks from me for the help that they proferd after the fact, but they did help enough that I was able to make ammends to my brothers and sisters in eBay land in a fairly short time. All of that from having to use a web interface to get the job done. Yes, it could’ve happened using a non-web app, but it would have been much less likely.
 
My two personal favorite browsers are Firefox and Safar – in that order; but in the real world I will have nothing to do with Firefox, because, of all the browsers I’m convinced that it goes the very deepest into the OS. In years past, and in more recent years, major performance improvements have been yielded by completely removing Firefox from an OS – I have even won a couple of low yield bets, that, removing Firefox from a given desktop system would immedately improve performance to a greater or lesser degree, but to a measurable degree in any case – and I won both times.
 
I have finally come to the point where I only use a browser when there’s no other way, and furthermore, when a company or individual provides a product or service that forces me to use a web browser or a web app, I move on to other vendors and service providers. And, that includes the likes of mint.com and intuit.com, based on the way they used to provide their various online services only a few years ago. I think that they now provide mobile and/or dedicated desktop apps for their products and services, ultimately furthering my point. Comeing back to the realm of media production, there are a couple of companies offering some very promising video sharing and production collaboration services – guess what their interfaces are? But, if they do well, I beleive that, in the long run, they will end up developing dedicated, non-web, apps.